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Data & Statistics
2010
By Foot, by Car or by Bus?
Eitan Bluer 2010
Usage patterns of various means of transportation among a city's population can indicate the city's geographic layout (e.g., whether it is a suburb or a commercial center), how accessible it is or the state of its public infrastructure (e.g., how developed and diverse are its mass transportation systems) as well as other economic indicators such as socioeconomic status, percentage of car owners, commercial development, etc.

Different modes of commuting to work include private car, public transportation and walking.  In 2008, 44% of those employed in Jerusalem commuted to work by car, both private and commercial (compared to 47% of workers in Tel Aviv and 52% nationwide).  The percentage of workers who commuted to work using public transportation in Jerusalem in 2008, whether by bus, train, taxi or company carpool, was considerable – 37%.  While this number was higher than the average in Tel Aviv (28%) and throughout the nation (29%), it was nevertheless lower than the national high which was recorded in Bat Yam (47%) and Bnei Brak (46%) from among all cities in Israel with 100,000 or more residents.  12% of those employed in Jerusalem said they walk to work, a percentage which is similar to the national average (11%) and the average in Tel Aviv (13%).
On a city-wide level, choices regarding modes of transportation for commuting to work are affected by a number of factors, including the geographic layout of the city's population, distances to employment centers, service quality of public transportation systems (e.g., frequency, route, number of stops and their placement, etc.) and the socioeconomic status of the local population.  In 2008, of Jerusalem's neighborhoods, the ones which boasted the highest percentage of workers who commuted to work by private car were Ramat Sharet and Ramat Denya (68%), Har Homa (67%), Gilo (57%), and French Hill (56%).  In contrast, the neighborhoods of Jerusalem with the highest percentages of workers who commuted to work by public transportation were Neve Yaakov (60%), Ramat Shlomo (57%), and the Kiryat Belz-Romema area (50%).  The areas with the highest percentages of workers who walked to work were Mea Sherarim-Geula (47%), the City Center (45%) and the Mahane Yehuda area (40%).

Source: 2008 Population Census, CBS  

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