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Additional Yearbook figures

The Statistical Yearbook of Jerusalem covers a broad range of central themes. Here follows a concise look at some of the others. 

Employment 2010 

In 2010 the rate of participation in the Jerusalem workforce (employees as well as unemployed persons who were actively seeking work, over the age of 15) was 46%, compared to 57% in all of Israel and 65% in Tel Aviv. The relatively low employment rate stems from the low number of ultra-orthodox (haredi) men and Arab women who work, as well as the relatively high rate of youths (aged 15-20) who are included in workforce statistics but in fact attend school or yeshivas or serve in the IDF. 

The rate of participation in the city's workforce of the Jewish population (51%) is lower than that for the same population in all of Israel (61%). 

The rate of participation in the city's workforce of the Arab population (36%) is lower than that for the same population in all of Israel (41%).  

In 2010 the number of employed persons in Jerusalem was 268,000. 


Employment by Population Group and Gender 2009

The rate of participation of men in the city's workforce was 53%, compared to 62% for men in all of Israel. 

The rate of participation of women in the city's workforce was 39%, compared to 52% for women in all of Israel. 

The rate of participation of Jewish women in the city's workforce was 51%, higher than that of Jewish men (48%); in Israel the situation is reversed, with the rate of Jewish working women lower, at 58%, than that of men, 62%. 

In 2009 the number of employed persons in Jerusalem was 263,000, representing 9% of the total number of employed persons in Israel. 

48% of those employed in the city worked in the public sector (compared to 32% in all of Israel and 26% in Tel Aviv), 3% in banking, insurance and finance (those figures were 4% in Israel; 11% in Tel Aviv), and 13% in financial services (14% in Israel; 25% in Tel Aviv). 

91% of employed Jerusalem residents worked in the city, compared with 75% of employed Haifa residents who worked in their city and 68% of employed Tel Aviv residents who worked in their city. 



Businesses 2009 

At the end of 2009 Jerusalem had 34,100 registered businesses (paying VAT) – 7% of the country’s total. In Tel Aviv there were 62,900, or 14% of the total number of registered businesses in Israel. 

During the course of 2009 408 new businesses opened in Jerusalem, compared with 544 in 2008. In Tel Aviv that figure was 1,519 and in Haifa 180 for the same period. 



Childbirth and Fertility Rates 2009 

In 2009 the childbirth rate (number of births per 1,000 residents) for the Jewish population in Jerusalem, at 27.6, was lower than that of the Arab sector, at 30.0. Yet Jerusalem is generally characterized by a higher overall childbirth rate than the rest of the country, and this was evident in 2009 as well, with 28.5 births per thousand residents, compared with 21.5 for the rest of Israel. 

In 2009 the fertility rate (the number of children a woman is likely to deliver in the course of her life) for the Jewish sector was slightly higher than that for the Arab sector, at 4.1 and 3.9, respectively. The fertility rate among Jewish women is showing a rising trend while that of their Arab counterparts is on the decline. 

In the last decade (1999-2009) the fertility rate among the Jewish population in Jerusalem rose while that of the city’s Arab population decreased. The general trend found in Jerusalem closely resembled that for all of Israel. 


Mortality 2009

In 2009 the mortality rates for Jerusalem’s Jewish population was 5.2 deaths for every thousand residents; this compared to 2.7 deaths for every thousand residents in the Arab sector. 


Natural growth 2009

The natural growth rate (the difference between the number of live births and the number of deaths) in Jerusalem is higher than that found in all of Israel. In 2009 it stood at 23.5 per thousand residents, compared to 16.4 for Israel. 

The natural growth rate among the Jewish (and non-Arab) population in Jerusalem is higher than that of the Jewish population in Israel – 21.6 compared to 14.7, respectively. 

The natural growth rate among the Arab population in Jerusalem, 26.8, is higher than that for all of Israel (23.2). 


 
Religious Attitudes and Affiliation 2007-09    

The following figures pertain to Jewish residents of Jerusalem, aged 20 and above, based on their definitions of their own degree of religiosity (average for the years 2007-09, processed for the Social Survey of the Central Bureau of Statistics):   

The proportion of  ultra-orthodox (haredis) in Jerusalem is 3.6 times greater than that in the rest of Israel; the proportion of Observant (but who are not haredi) in the city is 1.4 greater than that in the rest of Israel; while the rate of non-orthodox/secular residents is less than half of that in the rest of Israel.  

Of the residents of Jerusalem, 31% defined themselves as traditional; 29% as ultra-orthodox; 20% as non-observant/secular; and 20% as observant. 

The proportion of haredis (29%) and observant Jews (20%) in Jerusalem’s population is significantly higher compared to that in other Israeli cities that have a population exceeding 200,000. In Tel Aviv-Yafo, Rishon Lezion and Haifa haredis account for 2-3% of the population, and in Ashdod 10%. The proportion of observant residents in those cities fluctuates between 4-8%. 

The proportion of non-observant /secular residents in Jerusalem is low, at 20%, compared to 59% in Tel Aviv-Yafo and in Haifa, 47% in Rishon Lezion and 32% in Ashdod. 


Household Expenditures 2009 

Average monthly household expenditures in 2009 stood at NIS 11,900. This compared to NIS 13,000 in Israel and NIS 14,400 in Tel Aviv. It should be noted that not only is the figure lower in Jerusalem, it is also divided among a larger number of household members. The average number of household members in Jerusalem is 3.8, compared to 3.3 in Israel and 2.2 in Tel Aviv. 


Housing and Construction 2010 

There was a decline in the number of housing units whose construction was completed during this year: 1,794 residential units were built in 2010, compared to 1,945 the previous year. 

46% of the housing units that were completed in 2010 consist of 4 rooms, 27% of 5 rooms, and only 7% were 1-2-room apartments. 

In the last quarter of  2010 (October-December) the average price of a 3.5-4-room apartment in Jerusalem was NIS 1,579,600 – higher than the national average of NIS 1,186,800 and lower than the average in Tel Aviv (NIS 2,363,500). 

Housing prices continue to rise. In the last quarter of 2010 (October-December) the average price of a 3.5-4-room apartment in Jerusalem rose by 12%, compared to the previous year. In Israel the average price rose by 15% and in Tel Aviv by 11%, compared to Q4 in 2009. 

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