Support Us  Blog Contact Us עברית
The Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies
Home    News & Events   Articles
News & Events
Updates
Presentations
Events
Articles
Videos
News Database
Newsletter
Articles
Formerly religious, newly religious or ultra-orthodox?

In the social survey conducted by the Central Bureau of Statistics, Jews aged 20+ were asked about their degree of religiosity, and their family’s degree of religiosity when they were 15 years old. The survey offered five options: Non-religious – secular; not-so-religious traditional; religious traditional; religious; and ultra-Orthodox. For the purpose of the analysis, we combined the first two options (non-religious), and the two following options (non-ultra-Orthodox religious). In order to improve the accuracy of the analysis, we combined the data for the years 2007-2009.

A majority of respondents grew up in a family whose degree of religiosity was similar to the respondent’s degree of religiosity today. Of secular Jews (those who defined themselves as secular or non-religious traditional) in Israel, 80% grew up in a secular family; of religious Jews (those who defined themselves as religious or religious traditional), 82% grew up in a religious family; and of ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israel, 65% grew up in an ultra-Orthodox family. 

Note that the percentage among the ultra-Orthodox is lower, and about one quarter (23%) of ultra-Orthodox grew up in a non-ultra-Orthodox religious family, and 11% of them came from a secular family. Among the religious and the secular, there is greater stability, and the percentage of religious who grew up in a secular family (16%) is similar to the percentage of formerly religious (datlashim) – secular Jews who grew up in a religious family (20%).

In Jerusalem, the situation appears to be more dynamic, and a larger proportion of respondents reported that they grew up in a family that differed in its degree of religiosity from their current degree of religiosity. Of secular Jews, 72% grew up in a secular family (versus 80% in Israel, as above); among religious Jews, 78% grew up in a religious family (versus 82% in Israel). Among the ultra-Orthodox, however, the situation appears to be less dynamic than in Israel in general, and 72% of ultra-Orthodox Jews reported that they grew up in an ultra-Orthodox family (versus 65% in Israel). 19% of ultra-Orthodox in Jerusalem grew up in a non-ultra-Orthodox religious family (versus 23% in Israel), and 9% of them grew up in a secular family (versus 11% in Israel). 

The percentage of secular Jews who grew up in a religious family (formerly religious) is larger in Jerusalem than in Israel in general, and stands at 27% of secular Jews aged 20+ in Jerusalem, versus 20% in Israel. The proportion of religious Jews who grew up in a secular family (newly religious) is similar in Jerusalem (18% of religious aged 20+) to the proportion in Israel in general (16%).

Some of those who do not declare themselves to be religious observe certain aspects of religion. If, for example, we take the fast on Yom Kippur, it would appear that in Jerusalem, the percentage of people who fast on Yom Kippur (are strict or very strict about doing so) among those who define themselves as non-religious (67%, without people who do not fast for health reasons), is significantly higher than the percentage in Israel (59%). 

Previous Next
Advanced Search
© All rights reserved to The Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies Privacy Policy Consulting by InTv.co.il בניית אתרים ICS